Tuesday, February 13, 2018

An interesting parable...

Before I wrote today's first post, I was strongly considering writing the one I'm about to write now.  But then I saw that article about Levi Aron on my Facebook page and decided I needed to write about him and karaoke first.  Now that that's out of my system, on to today's original topic.


Sounds a lot like certain controlling belief systems to me...

I realize this subject will probably bore or offend some readers.  Once again, I'm writing this not so much to entertain people as I am to get thoughts out into the open.  Maybe some of you reading this will have a keen understanding about it.  This morning, I read this insightful allegorical reflection about the Mormon church.


Hmm... I was immediately reminded of something when I read this...

Anyone who has been Mormon will recognize the "parent" as the LDS church.  The "son" is any man who wants to be in the church and all of the conditions he must live by in order to be "worthy" to be at home.  Someone on this thread asked "What about the daughter?"  Another poster commented that the daughter would be expected to obey all of those conditions, plus stay home, cover up, and have babies.  I'm not sure that's entirely true in the church these days, though someone in the know will surely correct me if I'm wrong.

As I have mentioned many times, I am not LDS and never have been Mormon.  However, my husband was LDS for awhile.  He was also married to an abusive woman who forced him to live by a lot of the same rules this "parent" wishes to enforce if his "son" comes "home".  As I read the list, I was reminded that a lot of abusive partners have rules their non-abusive partners are expected to live by.  


Red alert!

While I'm sure some people in controlling religions don't have a problem with the rules and may even be comforted by them, other people find the rules stifling.  Some might look at church expectations and see them as "different" than relationship expectations.  To me, there isn't a lot of difference.  Both relationships involve emotional commitment, loyalty, and oftentimes, financial commitment.   


I hasten to add that many abusive people and organizations are guilty of financial abuse, too.

All of this is neither here nor there to me personally.  Bill and his ex wife are long divorced and he left Mormonism in 2006.  However, I couldn't help but recognize the parallels.  Things became much worse after they joined the church together.  I can imagine there are many women who are in stifling relationships with both their husbands and the church, though clearly not everyone feels that way or has had that experience.  While I realize there must be something compelling about the church for it to keep so many people coming back for more, I also think that life is tough enough as it is without another entity making so many demands.

I just thought this parable was good food for thought and wanted to preserve it... especially for those who might find it as meaningful and insightful as I do.


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